The Men’s Summer Style System, Part 4–SUMMER FORMAL

Up to this point for the men’s summer style system I’ve covered SUMMER LOW CASUAL and SUMMER MEDIUM CASUAL and SUMMER HIGH CASUAL.

We now move on the to penultimate option for summer dress and that’s SUMMER FORMAL.  There are 4 variations of SUMMER FORMAL and all involve some form of a suit and tie up to and including a Tuxedo.

Wear summer formal if you are going to the office, a wedding, the opera, or similar event where dressing more casual just would not do.

SUMMER FORMAL 1.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Linen suit

– Cotton suit

- Shirt:

- Long sleeve linen shirt

- Long sleeve cotton shirt

- Tie:

– Linen

– Cotton

– Silk

- Shoes

– Bluchers/Derbies with socks

- Belt: Matching with shoes

- Accessories: Pocket Square

 

Recommendation:  Although SUMMER FORMAL 1.0 incorporates a tie, one should be careful about when and where it is worn.   It is generally less appropriate for office environments than the lightweight/tropical wool suit.  However, for outdoor/indoor events that call for more formality, especially during the day (e.g. Church, school graduations), this option is a sensational choice.  If you can get away with wearing a linen or cotton suit to work, by all means do so.  Add a bit more formality with a double breasted jacket.

 

SUMMER FORMAL 2.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Lightweight/tropical wool suit

- Shirt:

– Long sleeve cotton shirt with button cuffs

- Tie:

– Linen

– Cotton

– Silk

- Shoes:

– Bluchers/Derbies with socks

- Belt: Matching with shoes

- Accessories: Pocket square

 

Recommendation:  SUMMER FORMAL 2.0 is perfect for the office.  Wearing a button cuff shirt and Bluchers is considered a bit less formal, but it will definitely pass with flying colors for any situation in which a suit is called for.  Wearing a double breasted jacket will up the style quotient.

 

SUMMER FORMAL 3.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Lightweight/tropical wool suit

- Shirt:

– Long sleeve cotton shirt with French cuffs

- Tie:

– Silk

- Shoes:

– Balmorals/Oxfords with socks

- Belt: Matching with shoes

- Accessories:

– Pocket square

– Cuff links (metal matches the belt buckle)

 

Recommendation:  The option upgrades the button cuff for French cuffs and cuff links and Balmoral/Oxford shoes.  These two additions take the lightweight/tropical suit to the pinnacle of business elegance, especially if worn with a double breasted jacket.

 

SUMMER FORMAL 4.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Black or midnight blue Tuxedo

-  Shirt:

– Pleated formal shirt with French cuffs

- Tie:

– Silk bow tie: bat wing, diamond, or butterfly

- Shoes:

– Patent leather Balmorals/Oxfords with matching socks

– Patent leather opera pumps with matching socks

- Button suspenders

- Accessories

– Cuff links (metal color/finish matches shirt studs)

– Shirt studs (metal color/finish matches the cuff links)

 

Recommendation:  The unsurpassed look of summer formality remains the venerable Tuxedo.  Wear one in midnight blue to add punch to your style.   

SUMMER FORMAL dress is the way to go if the event or situation calls for a suit and tie.  The key here is that the fabrics will work to keep you cool and looking good in the summer heat.

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

Article publié pour la première fois le 04/06/2013

The Suit Silhouette–What’s Right for You | Parisian Gentleman

See on Scoop.itTailored and Styled

When first hearing the phrase suit silhouette, it sounds a bit odd.

Joseph Scherrer‘s insight:

This fantastically comprehensive article by Sonya Glyn Nicholson, Senior Editor of Parisian Gentleman, is probably the best exposition of suit silhouette that I’ve come across.  Really excellent information here folks, especially since the silhouette of one’s suit will either enhance or detract from one’s style quotient.

The first task Sonia takes on is actually defining what is meant by “suit silhouette” and that is a particular combination of fit, looseness/tightness, fabric quality, and drape.

This is followed by a really nice discussion of the detailed elements of the silhouette and a well done differentiation of British, French-Italian, Neopolitan, and Ivy League silhouettes.

The piece wraps up with an expostion of how the cutter is central to how the suit silhouette ends up on a particular wearer’s body type.

This is a can’t miss, must read article, easily a Top 10 exemplar of sartorial knowledge.

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled

See on parisiangentleman.co.uk

Article publié pour la première fois le 10/06/2013

Gareth Mallory: Blue Pinstripe Suit

See on Scoop.itTailored and Styled

To contrast Daniel Craig’s fashion-forward suits, Ralph Fiennes’ government official Gareth Mallory in Skyfall dresses in timeless Savile Row style.

 

Joseph Scherrer‘s insight:

Excellent post by Matt Spaiser over at Suits of James Bond with a lively comment thread.

 

Bottom line:  Ralph Fiennes as Gareth Mallory way outdresses Daniel Craig as Bond.  Classic style trumps fashion!

See on thesuitsofjamesbond.com

Article publié pour la première fois le 23/02/2013

The Trousers Guide, Part 3 | Men’s Flair

See on Scoop.itTailored and Styled

See on www.mensflair.com

Joseph Scherrer‘s insight:

This is the final installment of a three-part series from Men’s Flair on trousers. The first two parts looked at leg width, rise, and cuffs. This last piece addresses pleats and pockets.

Much like cuffs, the subject of pleats is a partisan issue on men’s style forums. Some like pleats, some don’t. Some prefer reverse pleats, some forward pleats. Others like double pleats while some men swear by only one. There are even those that will have nothing but triple pleats. And like cuffs, there is no right or wrong answer.

I will offer this about pleats though. When constructed properly, they are more comfortable to wear, especially when sitting down. The extra material around the waistline eliminates bunching of the fabric and constriction around the upper thighs.

That said, when done poorly, they can make you look overweight and dumpy.

I prefer single pleats. i think there a good “middle ground” and they cut an elegant and clean line because of the way they transition into the crease on the pants.

Forward pleats and reverse pleats create different effects. With forward pleats draping smoothly over the thighs and reverse pleats creating more of a boxy shape.

Pockets can be slanted, on the side-seam, jeans-style, or Jodhpur style. The more sophisticated is the side-seam pocket because it blends vertically with the line of the pants. Slanted pockets are perfectly fine as well. Jeans-style and Jodhpur pockets–horizontal pockets just below the waist are more casual looking. Jeans-style and Jodhpur pockets can’t be put on pleated pants.

Here’s are the major points of this series:

- Wear your pants with a higher rise

- Make sure the width of your trouser legs are properly fitted to the length and size of your legs

- As a general rule, pleats go with cuffs and plain front pants are better cuffless.

- Side seam pockets are the most discreet and elegant. However,  slant, jeans-style, and Jodhpur pockets can also be good choices depending on the effect you want to achieve.

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

 

See on www.mensflair.com

Article publié pour la première fois le 01/03/2014

Friday Style Icon–Style Forum’s SpooPoker

4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Olive Tweed I

The Friday Style Icon is Style Forum’s SpooPoker.  Spoo is a prolific poster (more than 20,000 posts) on the site which includes his frequent “What Are You Wearing Right Now” (WAYWRN) photos.

Over time his style has evolved pretty significantly from a more colorful fashion-forward look to one that is comfortably classic.

4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Wool Tie4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Brown Blue Check II4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Olive Tweed II

Spoo’s suits are always impeccably tailored in all the best ways: jacket and sleeve length spot on, pants with just a hint of a break, button stance right at the waist, lapel notches aligned with the bottom of the tie knot, and softly rolled spread collars.  And let’s not forget the ties, lots of solid grenadines and seasonal wools and linens…all nicely dimpled.  Pocket squares set off the rest of the outfits sensationally.

4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Grey Green I4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Olive Tweed I

I am always impressed by his masterful combinations of color, pattern, fabrics, and texture–we’re looking at a major league sartorial exemplar in Spoo.

4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Pinstripes4-26-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Spoo Poker Brown Blue Check I

Spoo gets it right far, far more than he gets is wrong.  He sets an example very worthy of emulation.

Be well dressed!

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

 

Article publié pour la première fois le 26/04/2013