How Should a Suit Fit? Your Easy-to-Follow Visual Guide | Art of Manliness

See on Scoop.itTailored and Styled

“…if you’re really going to get any benefit out of having your suits adjusted, you need to know a little bit about tailors and the kinds of adjustments they can (and can’t) make.  You also need to know what a “good” fit actually looks like”

See on www.artofmanliness.com

Joseph Scherrer‘s insight:

This post should be self-explanatory.  A really well-done visual from The Art of Manliness that provides an excellent template for getting your suits to fit correctly–whether you’re getting them altered or custom made.

(Of course I recommend custom…much better chance of getting it to fit right the first time).

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled

 

Article publié pour la première fois le 06/10/2013

You Don’t Know Beau…And Why You Should

3-17-13 Tailored and Styed Blog Post--Beau Brummel Statue

If there was one man who embodied men’s style leadership in the tumultuous times following the American and French revolutions and Napoleonic wars, it was Englishman Beau Brummell.

Much ink has been spilled about Brummell to the point where he has become an archetypical, even mythical figure of men’s style.  Perhaps this elevated historical status is well-deserved given his enduring sartorial legacy.

Brummell lived during the critical bridge period in the early 1800’s where sumptuousness in dress was rapidly replaced by darker, less ostentatious dressing.

As stated in a previous post, this period was characterized by a political and economic struggle for power between the aristocracy and the rising commercial class.  Both sides had by then had access to and had adopted similar manners of dress, which placed the struggle for superiority clearly in the realm of the moral.

It’s into this milieu that Brummell strode in to make his lasting mark on men’s style.  Fundamentally, Brummell was the epicenter of early British dandyism.  Brummell’s famous quote suffices to sum up his approach, “If John Bull turns to look at you on the street, you are not well dressed.”

Whereas today, the word dandy conjures up images of colorful, eccentric, even flamboyant clothing.  For Brummell being a dandy meant an understated way of dressing that exemplified refined, indifferent elegance.  In contrast, today’s dandy has much more in common with the Macaroni, the Fop, and the Peacock.  So in a modern sense, Brummell was the anti-dandy, as once he established his refined style he stuck with it.

And for British society of the time, what a style it was.  Brummell was the first to focus on the nuances of fit, cut, and proportion.  His strategy was to elevate country attire to a refined minimalism.  To do this he used a surprisingly limited palette of colors: dark coats in black and blue, light-colored waistcoats and pantaloons usually in tan, and plain white shirts and starched linen cravats.

His look drew from military and equestrian traditions and was calculated to emphasize physique and authority.  He adopted the frock coat and elevated it for daily wear in town by skillful tailoring that suggested broad shoulders and a trim waist.  His buff colored pantaloons were closely fitted and held in place by a strap under the foot.  Footwear comprised knee-high black leather riding boots styled after those of the Prussian military.

The end result of these innovations was an ensemble that was at once stunningly unique, but also very familiar to the gentry of the time. In some ways it’s familiar to us in our time as well.

3-17-13 Tailored and Styed Blog Post--Beau Brummel Standard Dress3-17-13 Tailored and Styed Blog Post--Blue Blazer Khaki Pants

3-17-13 Tailored and Styed Blog Post--Beau Brummel Standard Dress 23-17-13 Tailored and Styed Blog Post--White Tie Evening Dress

Brummell’s impact still looms large across the historical horizon of men’s classic style.

3-17-13 Tailored and Styed Blog Post--Beau Brummel Statue

For us, if we take the best of Beau Brummell’s style sense, we arrive at the following: fit, proportion, excellent fabrics, conservative colors resulting in what I will call aesthetic precision as well as refined simplicity in dress, personal presence, and confidence brought about by dressing well.

And indeed we will adopt all of these principles as part of our approach to style.

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

Article publié pour la première fois le 18/03/2013

Friday Style Commentary

I’ve spent the past few days laying out my men’s summer style system.  I’ll work to refine the posts and pull into a series for easy access.

In the meantime, I’ll be putting up several style commentaries throughout the day on Friday on worthwhile posts I’ve gathered up…at least three.

- The first is the Friday Style Icon, Chris Despos, a U.S. tailoring legend and veritable walking encyclopedia of classic men’s style.

- Next is a piece called “Owning Your Style” informed by the equally iconic Alan Flusser

- And another one by Permanent Style blogging legend Simon Crompton about the goings on with Paul Stuart’s Phineas Cole brand

I’ll be posting these throughout the day, so check back often.

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

Article publié pour la première fois le 06/06/2013

Custom Tailoring & Shoemaking in Rio de Janeiro

8-9-13-Tailored-and-Styled-Blog-Post-Cafezinho.jpg

We’re heading downtown Rio de Janeiro today to link up with a good friend of Raphael Schneider.  Raphael, as many of you know, runs the highly regarded Gentleman’s Gazette, a comprehensive men’s lifestyle blog.

At any rate, we plan to meet over a cafezinho (a small, very strong Brazilian coffee).

8-9-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Cafezinho

After which we’ll tour some of the tailoring and shoemaking shops that dot the central zone of Rio.  This area is the main commercial district of the city which explains why there is a concentration of these type of shops in the vicinity.

8-9-13 Tailored and Styled Blog Post--Rio Downtown

Since my wife had previously promised a birthday gift of a custom-made jacket or shoes, guess what I’ll be doing while I’m there.  :>)

Neither Raphael or I are aware of anyone else who has written about the Brazilian custom tailoring scene, so we’re both excited to document it.

When the articles are ready, they’ll be posted on Gentleman’s Gazette.  I’ll let you know when that happens.

In the meantime consider this a promotional teaser of sorts.

Have a great weekend!

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

Article publié pour la première fois le 09/08/2013

The Men’s Summer Style System, Part 4–SUMMER FORMAL

Up to this point for the men’s summer style system I’ve covered SUMMER LOW CASUAL and SUMMER MEDIUM CASUAL and SUMMER HIGH CASUAL.

We now move on the to penultimate option for summer dress and that’s SUMMER FORMAL.  There are 4 variations of SUMMER FORMAL and all involve some form of a suit and tie up to and including a Tuxedo.

Wear summer formal if you are going to the office, a wedding, the opera, or similar event where dressing more casual just would not do.

SUMMER FORMAL 1.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Linen suit

– Cotton suit

- Shirt:

- Long sleeve linen shirt

- Long sleeve cotton shirt

- Tie:

– Linen

– Cotton

– Silk

- Shoes

– Bluchers/Derbies with socks

- Belt: Matching with shoes

- Accessories: Pocket Square

 

Recommendation:  Although SUMMER FORMAL 1.0 incorporates a tie, one should be careful about when and where it is worn.   It is generally less appropriate for office environments than the lightweight/tropical wool suit.  However, for outdoor/indoor events that call for more formality, especially during the day (e.g. Church, school graduations), this option is a sensational choice.  If you can get away with wearing a linen or cotton suit to work, by all means do so.  Add a bit more formality with a double breasted jacket.

 

SUMMER FORMAL 2.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Lightweight/tropical wool suit

- Shirt:

– Long sleeve cotton shirt with button cuffs

- Tie:

– Linen

– Cotton

– Silk

- Shoes:

– Bluchers/Derbies with socks

- Belt: Matching with shoes

- Accessories: Pocket square

 

Recommendation:  SUMMER FORMAL 2.0 is perfect for the office.  Wearing a button cuff shirt and Bluchers is considered a bit less formal, but it will definitely pass with flying colors for any situation in which a suit is called for.  Wearing a double breasted jacket will up the style quotient.

 

SUMMER FORMAL 3.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Lightweight/tropical wool suit

- Shirt:

– Long sleeve cotton shirt with French cuffs

- Tie:

– Silk

- Shoes:

– Balmorals/Oxfords with socks

- Belt: Matching with shoes

- Accessories:

– Pocket square

– Cuff links (metal matches the belt buckle)

 

Recommendation:  The option upgrades the button cuff for French cuffs and cuff links and Balmoral/Oxford shoes.  These two additions take the lightweight/tropical suit to the pinnacle of business elegance, especially if worn with a double breasted jacket.

 

SUMMER FORMAL 4.0

 

Elements:

- Suit:

– Black or midnight blue Tuxedo

-  Shirt:

– Pleated formal shirt with French cuffs

- Tie:

– Silk bow tie: bat wing, diamond, or butterfly

- Shoes:

– Patent leather Balmorals/Oxfords with matching socks

– Patent leather opera pumps with matching socks

- Button suspenders

- Accessories

– Cuff links (metal color/finish matches shirt studs)

– Shirt studs (metal color/finish matches the cuff links)

 

Recommendation:  The unsurpassed look of summer formality remains the venerable Tuxedo.  Wear one in midnight blue to add punch to your style.   

SUMMER FORMAL dress is the way to go if the event or situation calls for a suit and tie.  The key here is that the fabrics will work to keep you cool and looking good in the summer heat.

By Joe Scherrer | Tailored and Styled Writer

Article publié pour la première fois le 04/06/2013